• STEPS TO STARTING YOUR
    ELGIN ILLINOIS BUSINESS

  • Naming Your Business

    Names are quite powerful. Think about it: Most customers will hear your business name before they know anything about your business. Make your business name count! 

    Here are seven things to consider when determining a business-related name: 

    1. Easy to say and sounds good. Think about using an alliteration, using words that start with the same consonant, Coca-Cola or Jimmy John's. Say it aloud -- a lot -- and make sure this isn't a tongue twister situation. People need to say the name easily on the radio, a video or in general conversation.

    2. Use a name that has meaning to it and conveys a benefit. Once you know the core focus of your business, take some time to brainstorm keywords that describe your business. With a few descriptors of your business and brand, you'll be able to identify the ones that reflect the image you'd like to create. For example, if you're starting a photography business, words like "camera", "snap", "shoot", "capture", "lens", etc. are all good starting points for your business name.

    3. Avoid "cute" spellings. Do you spell Flickr with an "er" or not? Don't make it difficult! Potential customers for your new venture should be able to easily look up the name, and they shouldn't be asking whether a "you" is a "u." 

    4. Beware initials. They can be meaningless and boring. Yes, IBM and 3M have gotten away with initials, but these are multibillion-dollar corporations that have been around for decades. If you use initials try to get clever with it. For example, come up with a name that could be eventually used as a verb, or lends itself to the creation of your own "language." People who go to TED, the conference for Tech, Education and Design, now call themselves "TEDsters."

    5. Use specifics. Don't use a generic name that doesn't mean anything. Some good specifics are:  "The 4-Hour Work Week",  "8 Minute Abs" and "5-hour Energy."

    6. MAKE SURE YOUR CAN TRADEMARK THE NAME. It's worth it to check USPTO.gov -- or a new site called Trademarkia.com -- before settling on a name. Start with a search to see if the name you'd like is available. If it is, register it

    7. Test it out on Google AdWords. One of the great features of the keywords tool on AdWords is that it will list similar search phrases, along with how many global and local monthly searches each are getting. Some AdWords searches with the name you are considering can ensure there isn't a slightly different name out there that might get more attention on the Internet.